amplexus reservatus seen in the history of Catholic doctrine on the use of marriage
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amplexus reservatus seen in the history of Catholic doctrine on the use of marriage

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Published by University of Ottawa Press in Ottawa .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Sex (Theology) -- History of doctrines,
  • Birth control -- Religious aspects -- Catholic Church,
  • Marriage -- Religious aspects -- Catholic Church,
  • Sexualité (Théologie) -- Histoire des doctrines,
  • Naissances, Régulation des -- Aspect religieux -- Église catholique,
  • Mariage -- Aspect religieux -- Église catholique

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementAdam Exner.
SeriesSeriate publications ;, no. 69
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMLCM 91/11181 (K)
The Physical Object
Paginationxxiii, 271 p. :
Number of Pages271
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2909036M
LC Control Number84139319

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The amplexus reservatus: seen in the history of Catholic doctrine on the use of marriage. [Adam Exner] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library. Create. The Amplexus Reservatus. Seen in the History of Catholic Doctrine on the Use of Marriage [Texte imprimé] Auteur principal: Exner, Adam, O.M.I., Auteur Langue: anglais. The amplexus reservatus seen in the history of Catholic doctrine on the use of marriage, North American Catholic Alpha Conference, July 7 & 8, , Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada: opening address by archbishop Adam Exner.   And the Holy See has condemned amplexus reservatus, which is natural intercourse which deliberately lacks climax for both spouses. So the absence of climax in AP does not make the act not a sexual act, or not gravely immoral.

The Holy Office (12 Aug ) condemned the use of amplexus reservatus, even in marriage [Ford, Kelly, Marrige Questions p. ]. Amplexus reservatus is intercourse which would be of the natural type, except that both the husband and wife deliberately refrain from climax.   Amplexus Reservatus is (according to the Encyclopedia of Birth Control) one which does not involve penetration and therefore not consummation, and it is a form of coitus interruptus (not, as the words may suggest, of coitus reservatus). That book speaks of the A.R. as “a form that some Catholic writers have advocated”, which reflects the concern of the Holy See.   The Holy See condemned this act (Denzinger ) "With serious concern the Apostolic See notes that in recent times, a considerable number of authors, in treating the conjugal life, everywhere openly and in detail, go immodestly into every single aspect; and some, moreover, describe, approve, and recommend a certain act called amplexus reservatus. logy of Christian marriage. Reviewers of Mr. Noonan's book have been most lavish in their praise.? This review article can hardly do justice to this original, scholarly, and historical-cri- tical study of the growth of the Church's doctrine on contra- * CONTRACEPTION: A History of Its Treatment by the Catholic Theologians and Canonkts.

The amplexus reservatus seen in the history of Catholic doctrine on the use of marriage Exner, Adam. Published by University of Ottawa Press (). Adam Exner: The Amplexus Reservatus seen in the History of Catholic Doctrine on the Use of Marriage. Allen Edwardes: Cradle of Erotica For me, this is a puzzle coming together.   The Holy See, under Pope Pius XII, condemned a type of gravely immoral sexual act, even when used within marriage, called “amplexus reservatus”. [Denz. ] This act is the same as natural intercourse between husband and wife, except that climax is absent for both persons. Amplexus reservatus was a form of intimacy in which the man would give the woman any pleasure she liked, but he himself would forego orgasm. The view that acting to prevent a child from being formed in the first place — contraception — is similar to homicide and in some ways more radical than it, was not unique to St. John Chrysostom.